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Jul 22 22

Sparking Innovation: Introducing the Newest Recipients of Good Shepherd Innovation Grants

by Jon Brannan
Good Shepherd Innovation Grants

ALLENTOWN and PHILADELPHIA, PA — Good Shepherd unveiled the latest recipients of the Good Shepherd Innovation Grants, a program that invests significantly in idea generation for team members at Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network in the greater Lehigh Valley region and Good Shepherd Penn Partners in greater Philadelphia and New Jersey.

All told, eight projects received a Learn Grant. The program — led by Emily Lyter, PT, DPT, administrative director of Good Shepherd Learns, Creates and Research at Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network, and Jennifer Dekerlegand, MPT, CHRC, manager of research, education and quality at Good Shepherd Penn Partners — aims to harness employees’ enthusiasm, natural curiosity and deep dedication. The Good Shepherd Innovation Grants provide financial support and development opportunities for employee-led projects that improve patient care and define the future of rehabilitation.

Congratulations to the latest round of Good Shepherd Innovation Grants recipients:

Virtual Reality

Leads: Jonathan Brannan, MBA (Good Shepherd Rehabilitation) and Kyle Cunningham, PT, DPT, NCS, CBIS (Good Shepherd Penn Partners)
Departments: Institutional Advancement; Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network Therapy; Good Shepherd Penn Partners Therapy

Work Life Well-Being for Good Shepherd Associates

Lead: Chaplain Kelly Brooks (Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network)
Departments: Human Resources, Psychology

Good Shepherd Resident Volunteer/Work Program

Lead: Amanda Devaney, MS, CCC-SLP/L (Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network)
Departments: Speech, Pediatrics; Occupational Therapy, Good Shepherd Home – Raker Center; Volunteer Coordinator

An Interdisciplinary Approach to Reduce Neurovascular/Neuro-oncology and Neurosurgery Acute Care Length of Stay with Earlier Transitions to Acute Rehabilitation

Lead: Deidre Geroni, MSW (Good Shepherd Penn Partners)
Departments: Case Management, Penn Medicine Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Creation of an Augmentative & Alternative and Assistive Technology Clinic

Lead: Kylee Haller, MA, CCC-SLP (Good Shepherd Penn Partners)
Departments: Outpatient Therapy

Examine Whether Race Differences and Patient-reported Outcomes Exist in Outpatient Physical Therapy Utilization for Women with Pelvic Health Conditions

Lead: Denise Hartzell-Leggin, PT, MBA, WCS (Good Shepherd Penn Partners)
Departments: Outpatient Therapy

Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network Dizziness and Balance Center

Lead: Kelley Limbauan, PT, DPT, NCS (Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network)
Department: Physical Therapy, Hyland Center for Health & Technology

Good Shepherd Spinal Cord Injury Skills for Success Program

Lead: Noreen Yamamoto, COTA/L (Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network)
Departments: Occupational Therapy, Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Hospital

Jun 30 22

What is Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy?

by Jon Brannan
What is pelvic floor physical therapy?

If you’ve had physical therapy for a shoulder injury, knee replacement or even a stroke, you’ve probably done exercises, lifted weights and pulled colorful rubber bands in a gym full of other patients.

So you might be confused when your doctor recommends physical therapy for your pelvic pain or bowel and bladder symptoms.

“What does lifting weights have to do with my bladder?” you might ask.  

Pelvic therapy is similar but different to other types of therapy.  It’s similar because it aims to address problems in the neuromusculoskeletal system — your muscles, joints, connective tissue and nerves. But pelvic therapy services are different because they are delivered one-on-one in a private room. 

Who Needs Pelvic Floor Therapy?

Pelvic floor therapy is recommended as a first-line treatment for many disorders of the pelvic region.  If the symptoms stem from the pelvic floor, therapy is the treatment of choice for men, women and adolescents. 

What Can Pelvic Floor Therapy Help With?

Pelvic therapy can help with problems that are often caused by muscle tone imbalances and strength of the pelvic floor and nearby structures that result in:

  • Frequent urination
  • Urinary urgency
  • Unwanted loss of urine or stool (incontinence)
  • Pain in the pelvis, hip, abdomen, thigh, low back,
  • Sexual pain
  • Constipation
  • Pregnancy/post-partum pain or incontinence

How Does Pelvic Floor Therapy Work?

The first step is to evaluate the pelvic floor and assess the movement, strength and muscle tone in your low back, hips and abdomen through an internal exam

This exam uses manual palpitation with one finger and is different from a female gynecological exam, which uses instruments (speculum).  The exam is not usually painful but will determine if therapy is appropriate and the appropriate plan of care.

What Techniques are Used in Pelvic Floor Therapy?

Depending on the problems identified, treatment may include:

  • Strengthening or stretching exercises of the trunk, legs, or pelvic muscles
  • Techniques to improve shortened or overactive pelvic muscles
  • Coordination exercises
  • Education in self-management and prevention
  • Biofeedback for either strengthening or relaxation of the pelvic muscles
  • Modalities like heat, ice, or electrical stimulation. 

Strengthening exercises can often be a component of the therapy, but do not necessarily require gym equipment.

Does Pelvic Floor Physical Therapy Work?

Pelvic floor therapy is usually very effective at reducing symptoms. Most patients begin to see a reduction in pain and other issues after only six to eight sessions.


To learn how pelvic floor therapy can help you, call Penn Therapy & Fitness at 1-877-969-7342

May 11 22

Rock Steady Boxing

by Jen Ingham
Parkinson's patient boxing.

Penn Therapy & Fitness in Conshohocken offers two levels of Rock Steady Boxing classes.

What Is Rock Steady Boxing? 

Rock Steady Boxing is a non-contact boxing exercise program that promotes fitness and function in individuals living with Parkinson’s disease. In addition to providing fitness, the program has been shown to improve confidence, quality of life and energy levels for individuals living with Parkinson’s disease.

Class Schedule

  • High Intensity Classes: Wednesdays at 4:30 – 5:30 pm
  • High Intensity Classes: Fridays at 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Costs

  • $10.00 per class
  • Payment required before start of class
  • Cash and all major credit cards accepted

How To Get Started

Call 610-828-7595 to schedule an initial evaluation prior to your first class. 

May 11 22

Restore Your Pelvic Floor Class

by Jen Ingham

This class will teach you about the role of the pelvic floor, the importance of coordinated breathing, and exercises to help alleviate your pain and discomfort. We will help you begin a practice of integrating pelvic floor awareness, movement and strength into your life.

Designed for Anyone Experiencing:

  • Involuntary bladder or bowel leakage
  • Leaking with cough, laugh, sneeze, physical activity or position changes
  • Heaviness or discomfort in the lower pelvic region

Virtual Class Led By a Pelvic Health Physical Therapist

  • Coordinated breathing
  • Exercises and strategies to support the pelvic floor
  • Increasing awareness, movement and strength into everyday life

Date & Time

5:30 – 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month.

Location

Due to COVID-19, the group meets virtually via BlueJeans videoconferencing.

Registration

To attend, please register by contacting [email protected].

Instructions for accessing BlueJeans and link to meeting will be provided in advance of class.

Cost

The class registration fee is $10. Click here to pay the fee online.

Please note – registrations entered less than 24 hours prior to the start of the class will not be processed in time. You will be registered for the next available class.

May 11 22

Navigating the Fourth Trimester: Your Postpartum Body and Health

by Jen Ingham
Jolly excited young African woman with pony tail enjoying maternity and having fun with baby son at home

This class is intended to educate women in the postpartum phase on some of the most common causes of musculoskeletal and pelvic floor dysfunction following pregnancy and delivery. We offer tips and advice on management of these conditions, as well as some helpful guidance on returning to physical activity.

New Moms: Need help with common postpartum pelvic floor problems?

  • Leaking and pain
  • Diastasis recti (abdominal weakness)
  • Hip, low back, and pelvic pain
  • Safe return to physical activity, exercise and sports

Date & Time

5:30 – 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month.

Location

Due to COVID-19, the group meets virtually via BlueJeans videoconferencing.

Registration

To attend, please register by contacting [email protected].

Instructions for accessing BlueJeans and link to meeting will be provided in advance of class.

Cost

The class registration fee is $10. Click here to pay the fee online.

Please note – registrations entered less than 24 hours prior to the start of the class will not be processed in time. You will be registered for the next available class.